Todd and Julie Chrisley found guilty on all charges in federal bank fraud and tax evasion trial | Fox News

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Todd and Julie Chrisley, from the long-running reality show “Chrisley Knows Best,” were found guilty on all charges of bank fraud and tax evasion in an Atlanta, Georgia courtroom on Tuesday.

The couple was initially indicted in August 2019, and a new indictment was filed in February, where the couple faced 12 counts of bank and wire fraud, tax evasion, and conspiracy over a nine-year period, all of which they denied.

Chrisley attorney Bruce Morris told Fox News Digital: “Disappointed with the verdict. Appeal is planned.”

Todd was convicted of conspiracy to commit bank fraud, bank fraud, conspiracy to defraud the United States and tax fraud. Julie was convicted of conspiracy to commit bank fraud, bank fraud, conspiracy to defraud the United States, and tax fraud. She was also charged with wire fraud and obstruction of justice.

The trial began three weeks ago and jury deliberations started on Friday, with a verdict delivered on Tuesday.

The Chrisleys could each face up to 30 years in prison, and a sentencing hearing will take place on another date.

The “Chrisley Knows Best” stars were found guilty on all counts of tax evasion and bank fraud stemming from 2019 indictment. They are pictured here in season four promotions.
(Tommy Garcia)

Peter Tarantino, an accountant hired by the Chrisleys, is charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and two counts of willfully filing false tax returns. He was also found guilty.

After they were found guilty, U.S. District Judge Eleanor Ross allowed the Chrisleys to remain free on bond. But she placed them on location monitoring and home detention, meaning they can only leave the house for certain reasons, including work, medical appointments and court appearances. They also have to alert their probation officers to any spending over $1,000, according to the order entered Tuesday.

Morris argued in court that the Chrisleys were victims of Mark Braddock, who oversaw Chrisley Asset Management, and was responsible for the defrauding without the couple’s knowledge until they fired him in 2012.

Prosecutors initially said in the indictment that the couple submitted fake documents to banks when applying for loans, Julie also allegedly submitted a false credit report and fake bank statements when trying to rent a house in California, and then the couple allegedly refused to pay rent a few months after they started using the home.

The Chrisleys also allegedly used their 7C production company to hide income to keep the IRS from collecting unpaid taxes owed by Todd. He also allegedly directed an employee to falsify income and asset documents.

Julie and Todd Chrisley could face up to 30 years in prison each for tax evasion and fraud charges.
( Paul Archuleta)

In an Instagram post shared before the indictment was even released, Todd accused a former employee of stealing from the couple and bringing fake documents to the U.S. attorney’s office.

Prosecutors accused the couple of giving the former employee orders to falsify documents in an alleged scheme from 2007-2012, which also involved submitting fake bank and financial statements to financial institutions to get millions of dollars in loans. 

Todd and Julie did see a minor court victory in 2019 when the Georgia Department of Revenue cleared the couple of a $2 million state tax evasion charge stemming from a two-year investigation from nearly eight years of returns beginning in 2008.

“Julie and I knew all along that we had done nothing wrong and that when the facts all came out, we would be fine,” Todd said in a statement at the time. “We’re just glad that the Department of Revenue was willing to keep an open mind and look at all the evidence.”

The Department of Revenue dropped its claim that the couple , penalties and interest, and updated the total outstanding debt to under $110,000.

The Chrisley family posed for season one of their USA show in 2014. Todd and Julie Chrisley face up to 30 years each in jail for multiple counts of tax and fraud charges.
(Tommy Garcia/USA Network)

Between 2008-2016, the pair had overpaid taxes four years, and had a net liability of less than $77,000 in overdue taxes for just one year of incorrect filing in 2009, which has since been paid.

“Chrisley Knows Best” has followed the family for nearly one decade, and originally premiered in March 2014 on the USA network. 

Todd and Julie initially lived in Georgia before moving their clan to Nashville, Tennessee during the fourth season. The series was renewed for a 10th season set to air later this year, and new episodes begin again on June 23. Reruns of earlier seasons can be seen on Bravo, E! and video on demand.

E! recently announced it is moving forward with a new dating series hosted by Todd, called “Love Limo.”